United States exceeds 700,000 deaths from COVID-19, despite wide availability of vaccines

De los últimos 100,000 fallecidos por Covid-19 en el país, sólo 2,900 correspondían a personas vacunadas.


Of the last 100,000 deaths from Covid-19 in the country, only 2,900 corresponded to vaccinated people.

Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

In the United States, more than 700,000 people have died from the coronavirusaccording to a New York Times count, a figure few experts had anticipated months ago when vaccines became widely available to the entire American population.

The The overwhelming majority of Americans who have died in recent months, a period in which the country has offered wide access to vaccines, were not vaccinated.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the United States there are 1,900 deaths a day on average in the last week.

According to that record, de of the last 100,000 deaths from Covid-19 in the country, only 2,900 corresponded to vaccinated people.

The United States has had one of the highest recent death rates of any country with a large supply of vaccines.

The alarming new increase in deaths this summer means that the pandemic has become the deadliest in American history, surpassing the toll of the 1918-1919 flu, which killed an estimated 675,000 people.

“This Delta wave goes through the unvaccinated,” Howard Markel, a medical historian at the University of Michigan, told the New York Times.

“The deaths that have followed the wide availability of vaccines were absolutely unnecessary.”

The people who died in the last three and a half months were concentrated in the South, a region that has lagged behind in vaccinations.

The most of the muerts were recorded in Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

Vaccines have been shown to be highly effective in preventing serious illness and death, and a CDC study published in September found that after Delta became the dominant variant, unvaccinated people were 10 times more likely to die from cause of the virus than vaccinated.

Younger and younger fatalities

Those who died were also younger: in August, all age groups under 55 recorded their highest death toll.

About 40% of the 100,000 most recent people to die from the virus were under the age of 65, a higher proportion than at any other point in the pandemic.

The pace of death accelerated, then slowed, and then accelerated again over the past 18 months as the virus spread across the United States in waves.

The 100,000 most recent deaths occurred over more than three months, a considerably slower rate than when the pandemic peaked last winter.

During that previous surge, only 34 days passed between the 400,000th death and the 500,000th death.

Tired doctors and nurses expressed frustration that many of the patients whose lives they were now fighting to save had rejected vaccines.

People 65 and older, who are among the most vulnerable to serious illness from the virus, have the highest vaccination rate of all age groups with 83% fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

Vaccination rates are lower for people in their 30s, and the number of people in that age group who died from the virus in August was nearly double the number of people who died in January.

More than 3,800 people age 40 and younger died from COVID-19 in August, compared to 2,800 in January.

“If you look back when the virus first started, the mantra was, this seems to be a disease that affects older people more severely, and fortunately younger people don’t seem to get as sick of it,” he said. “Younger people now feel that this is a virus that will not affect them.”

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