What are the healthiest vegetable oils?


Oil is a fatty liquid that has a higher density than water and cannot dissolve in it.

There are different types, such as fuel, mineral or cosmetic. Here we are going to review foods, specifically those of plant origin, so that you know all their properties.

What is oil?

When we talk about edible oils we can make certain distinctions. In principle, there are those of animal origin, such as fish, whale or seal oil, or those of vegetable origin, such as sesame, corn, sunflower, coconut, avocado, grape or olive seeds, among others.

  • These are the best cooking oils

They can also be differentiated into virgin and refined oils. The former are obtained by means of a press, which allows them to preserve the flavor of the fruit or seed from which they are extracted.

Instead, refined oils are obtained by centrifugation and subsequent filtration to separate the finer residues.

Being fats in a liquid state, vegetable oils provide saturated fats (which are advised to represent only 10% of calories consumed) and unsaturated, both mono and polyunsaturated.

The latter are recommended by nutritionists, since they offer Omega 3, Omega 6 and Omega 9 acids, oleic, linolenic and linoleic acid.

Let’s see what are the best options to add to the diet when it comes to oils:

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Olive oil

It is obtained from the olive or olive, fruit of the olive tree (Olea europaea). Among oils, extra virgin olive oil contains the highest level of antioxidant polyphenols and oleic acid, which is why it is considered healthier than the other types.

Although it is also high in calories, so it should be consumed in moderation. Its intake has been linked to many benefits:

  • Helps control diabetes.
  • Helps care for skin and hair health.
  • Reduces the risk of hypertension.
  • Prevents cardiovascular problems.
  • It has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Protects against infections.
  • Reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood.

Sesame oil

It is obtained from sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum). Sesame oil stands out for being resistant to rancidity (alteration that over time affects the flavor of a food).

Its consumption is usually linked to the following benefits:

  • Strengthens bones and joints.
  • Improve defenses.
  • Reduces the risk of hypertension.
  • Reduces Cholesterine and Triglycerids levels.
  • It has anti-inflammatory properties.

Avocado oil

It is obtained from the avocado or avocado, fruit of the plant american persea. It is used both raw and for cooking (highlighting its high smoke point). Its use as a lubricant or cosmetic is also common.

What are the healthiest vegetable oils?

Although scientific evidence is scarce, its consumption is usually linked to the following benefits:

  • Improves skin and hair health.
  • Reduces the risk of obesity.
  • Reduces Cholesterine and Triglycerids levels.
  • It has anti-inflammatory properties.
  • It has detoxifying properties.
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Canola oil

It is obtained from the rapeseed or raps plant (Brassica napus). Canola oil is characterized by its rich content of oleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, although the presence of linoleic and alpha-linolenic also stands out.

In 2006, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) noted that replacing dietary fats and oils (rich in saturated fats) with canola oil could reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.
Its consumption is usually associated with the following benefits:

  • Helps control diabetes.
  • Helps protect the liver.
  • Reduces the risk of heart disease.
  • Reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood.
  • It has anti-inflammatory properties.

camelina oil

It is obtained from the plant camelina sativapopularly known as bastard sesame, pleasure gold or false linen.

Camelina oil is used for gastronomic purposes, but also cosmetic and industrial. Its consumption has been linked to the following benefits:

  • Strengthens the bones.
  • Helps in the recovery of wounds.
  • Stimulates the defenses.
  • Improves hair health.
  • Protects the joints.
  • Reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood.
  • It has moisturizing effects, useful for skin care.
  • It has detoxifying properties.

peanut oil

It is obtained from peanuts or peanuts (Arachis hypogaea), either by pressing or cooking. Peanut oil is characterized by having a mild flavor, making it ideal for use cold, for example, accompanying salads. However, it also has a high smoke point, making it common as a frying oil.

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Its consumption is usually linked to the following benefits:

  • Helps control blood glucose levels.
  • Helps control blood pressure levels.
  • Protects the joints.
  • Reduces the risk of obesity.
  • Reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood.
  • Grape seed oil

    As its name indicates, it is obtained from the seeds of grapes (Vitis vinifera). It is preferably used cold, although it has a high smoking point so it is good for frying.

    It is rich in Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, linolenic and linoleic acid, as well as vitamin E. Its consumption is usually linked to the following benefits:

    • Helps control diabetes.
    • Reduces the risk of overweight and obesity.
    • Reduces cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood.
    • Prevents hypertension.
    • To remind:

      Until there is meaningful scientific evidence from human trials, people interested in using herbal therapies and supplements should be very careful.

      Do not abandon or modify your medications or treatments, but first talk to your doctor about the potential effects of alternative or complementary therapies.

      Remember, the medicinal properties of herbs and supplements can also interact with prescription drugs, other herbs and supplements, and even alter your diet.

      Sources consulted: US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), American Heart Association, Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database, US National Library of Medicine, US Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Complementary Medicine and Alternative.

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